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Letter on production commitments casts doubt on GM-UAW talks

DETROIT — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer says she’s concerned about the growing impact of the United Auto Workers union’s strike against General Motors.

Whitmer visited workers on the picket lines at a GM plant near the state capital of Lansing Monday as the strike entered its fourth week. She says it’s important for both sides to find common ground as quickly as possible.

Whitmer is concerned about the state’s economy as the strike impact spreads to the automobile supply chain.

The strike by 49,000 workers began Sept. 16 halted production at GM’s U.S. factories. On Monday, GM shut down V8 engine and continuously variable transmission assembly lines at its Ramos Arizpe plant in Mexico, idling about 415 workers. Earlier the company closed two assembly plants in Mexico and Canada.

Turn for the worse

Contract talks aimed at ending the 21-day strike are taking a turn for the worse, hitting a big snag over product commitments for U.S. factories.

A new letter from UAW Vice President Terry Dittes to workers casts doubt on whether there will be a quick settlement in the contract dispute, which sent 49,000 workers to the picket lines on Sept. 16, crippling GM’s factories.

Dittes’ letter says the union presented a proposal to the company Saturday. He said GM responded Sunday morning by reverting back to an offer that had been rejected and made few changes.

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